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Engineering    2017, Vol. 3 Issue (2) : 272 -278     https://doi.org/10.1016/J.ENG.2017.01.022
Research |
The 2 °C Global Temperature Target and the Evolution of the Long-Term Goal of Addressing Climate Change—From the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Changeto the Paris Agreement
Yun Gao1(),Xiang Gao2,Xiaohua Zhang3
1. Department of Science & Technology and Climate Change, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing 100081, China
2. Energy Research Institute, National Development and Reform Commission, Beijing 100038, China
3. National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation (NCSC), Beijing 100038, China
Abstract
Abstract  

The Paris Agreement proposed to keep the increase in global average temperature to well below 2?°C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5?°C above pre-industrial levels. It was thus the first international treaty to endow the 2?°C global temperature target with legal effect. The qualitative expression of the ultimate objective in Article 2 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has now evolved into the numerical temperature rise target in Article 2 of the Paris Agreement. Starting with the Second Assessment Report (SAR) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), an important task for subsequent assessments has been to provide scientific information to help determine the quantified long-term goal for UNFCCC negotiation. However, due to involvement in the value judgment within the scope of non-scientific assessment, the IPCC has never scientifically affirmed the unacceptable extent of global temperature rise. The setting of the long-term goal for addressing climate change has been a long process, and the 2?°C global temperature target is the political consensus on the basis of scientific assessment. This article analyzes the evolution of the long-term global goal for addressing climate change and its impact on scientific assessment, negotiation processes, and global low-carbon development, from aspects of the origin of the target, the series of assessments carried out by the IPCC focusing on Article 2 of the UNFCCC, and the promotion of the global temperature goal at the political level.

Keywords Climate change      International negotiation      Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change      United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change      Long-term goal      Critical vulnerability      Intuitive building     
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Corresponding Authors: Yun Gao   
Just Accepted Date: 16 March 2017   Online First Date: 07 April 2017    Issue Date: 27 April 2017
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Yun Gao,Xiang Gao,Xiaohua Zhang. The 2 °C Global Temperature Target and the Evolution of the Long-Term Goal of Addressing Climate Change—From the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Changeto the Paris Agreement[J]. Engineering, 2017, 3(2): 272 -278 .
URL:  
http://engineering.org.cn/EN/10.1016/J.ENG.2017.01.022     OR     http://engineering.org.cn/EN/Y2017/V3/I2/272
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